this bag won’t be around in 1000 years

in fact this bag will disappear in approx
6 months*

*when industrially composted

because our bags
are made of plants
(not plastic)

Our 100% biodegradble materials

We use two types of plant-based material to make our kibble and treat bags.

bioplastic

We make our plastic from potatoes, a low-intensity crop that grows abundantly in Europe. Using a local plant also reduces our transportation footprint.

paper

We only use paper that is FSC certified. That means it comes from forests that are carefully managed and replanted.

Let's talk about paper

We use paper for the outer layer of our packaging, it’s a natural choice, and it feels kinda nice too.

Just like Edgard and Cooper, we love forests and appreciate all they do for us. That’s why we only use paper from responsibly-managed woodlands.

Renewable resource

A well-managed woodland is constantly replanted. Unlike ‘finite’ fossil fuels that are used to make plastic, trees are renewable because they grow back naturally.

Removing CO2 from our atmosphere

Our climate is changing because there are too many greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Trees absorb CO2 when they grow, so when we look after forests, they look after us.

FSC Mix certified

The paper we use is all FSC certified. Some comes from FSC forests, some from recycled material, and some from regulated woodlands.

Our plastic grows in fields

The tricky thing about packaging tasty food (like ours!) is that it needs a waterproof seal to stay fresh and full of juicy goodness. Which is where bioplastic comes in...

We make our ‘plastic’ using potatoes — a low-intensity crop that grows back every year.

Biodegradable

Oil-based plastics never really go away - they just get smaller. In comparison, plant-based plastics can be composted into harmless, natural byproducts that can be used to grow more potatoes.

Local crops

Different bioplastics use different plants. We chose GMO-free European potatoes to make our packaging because a local crop means an even smaller carbon footprint.

More plants, less carbon

At the moment, there’s too much carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. Like all plants, potatoes absorb CO2 when they grow - while also releasing oxygen - a win win for the environment.

the plastic

problem

When we use fossil fuels to make plastic, we’re making something ‘unnatural’. The microorganisms that eat almost everything else on the planet (like trees and potatoes) don’t know what to do with plastic. And that’s why it never really goes away.
our biodegradable
solution

When a material is ‘biodegradable’, it means microorganisms can break it down into natural, harmless, useful byproducts - like water, CO2 and compost.

We’re waiting for a certificate which will let you put our bags in a green waste bin. (For now, you can put them in your general waste - they’ll still biodegrade in landfill, just a bit more slowly than we’d like).

the secret life of bags

Our bags are designed to fit the circular economy. Let’s take a look at their journey below.

We make biodegradable packaging

We use wood pulp to make the outer paper packaging and bioplastic pellets to make the protective inner film. Both are joined with a toxic-free glue, before printing and packing!

Empty bags go in the green waste bin

Where available, green waste is separated from landfill and recycling and sent to a special composting centre.

Green waste goes to industrial composting

Composting is a natural process, but we can speed it up by creating the perfect conditions. That means warm temperatures and plenty of nutrients, moisture and oxygen.

The result? Compost,
water and CO2

After about six months of composting, our bags will have turned into three harmless and useful byproducts.

Putting compost to good use

The compost from our bags (and other biodegradable products) is used in landscaping, garden centres and agriculture to grow more plants!

Potatoes to bioplastic

Our suppliers extract the starch from potatoes and turn it into bioplastic granules.

Wood to pulp

Our suppliers turn wood from sustainable forests into cellulose fibres.

Which bin?

Here’s a guide to show you exactly what to do with our kibble bags.

Yes

Landfill doesn’t provide the best conditions for composting our bags – but it’ll always be faster than plastic, with none of the harmful by-products!

Certification pending

Our Industrial Composting Certificate is due end of 2019. But we’d still like you check what you can put in your green bin.

No

Our kibble bags are designed to break down into water, CO2 and compost - rather than be recycled into new bags.

No

Home composting is a slow and seasonal process, and we’d hate to mess up your system. One day, maybe.

No

Because metal doesn’t degrade, putting it in landfill is a huge waste of valuable resources.

No

Because metal doesn’t degrade, putting it in your green bin wastes a precious raw material and could contaminate this waste stream.

Yes

Give them a rinse and pop them in your recycling box or bag. They’ll be turned into new tins and cups within just 60 days.

No

Because metal doesn’t degrade, putting it in your home compost wastes a precious raw material and might damage your composting.

Yes

Landfill doesn’t provide the best conditions for composting our bags – but it’ll always be faster than plastic, with none of the harmful by-products!

Certification pending

Our Industrial Composting Certificate is due end of 2019. But we’d still like you check what you can put in your green bin.

No

Our kibble bags are designed to break down into water, CO2 and compost - rather than be recycled into new bags.

No

Home composting is a slow and seasonal process, and we’d hate to mess up your system. One day, maybe.

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